Upleatham

UPLEATHAM, a parish, in the union of Guisborough, E. division of the liberty of Langbaurgh, N. riding of York, 2½ miles (N. E. by N.) from Guisborough; containing, with part of the township of Redcar, 329 inhabitants, of whom 209 are in Upleatham township. This place, in Domesday book written Upelider, was granted by the Conqueror to Hugh, Earl of Chester, and was afterwards the fee of Robert de Brus. It descended to the lords Fauconberge, and from them to the lords Conyers; the Athertons subsequently held the estate, and among other families that have had possessions here, occur those of Lowther and Dundas. The parish forms part of the district called Cleveland, and comprises about 1100 acres; the soil is a rich loam, and the surface boldly undulated, commanding from the higher grounds some fine sea views. Freestone of good quality for building is found in abundance. The village is pleasantly situated on a declivity. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £80; patron and appropriator, the Archbishop of York, whose tithes have been commuted for £236. The church was rebuilt in 1836, at an expense of £450, by subscription, towards which the lord of the manor contributed £200, the late archbishop £100, and the Incorporated Society £75; it is a neat structure in the Norman style. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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