Pendeen

PENDEEN, an ecclesiastical district, in the parish of St. Just, union of Penzance, W. division of the hundred of Penwith and of the county of Cornwall, 6½ miles (N. W.) from Penzance; containing 2700 inhabitants. This district lies on the north-west coast of the county, and is partly bounded by Pendeen cove; westward it is bounded by the sea. It extends two miles and a quarter from north to south, and two miles and a half from east to west; and is a dreary, treeless tract, disfigured by mining operations. There are several tin and copper mines, of which the principal are Levant and Botallack. The district was constituted in January 1846, under the act 6th and 7th Victoria, cap. 37: the church has not yet been built. The dissenters have six places of worship. At Pendeen is an extensive cave, to which the Britons probably retired as a place of security, with their property, from the assaults of the Saxons or piratical Danes; and in different parts of the district are cairns and ancient circles. Dr. William Borlase, author of the Natural History and Antiquities of Cornwall, was born here.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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