Michael, St., or Midshall

MICHAEL, ST., or Midshall, formerly a representative borough and a market-town, partly in the parish of St. Enoder, and partly in that of Newlyn, union of St. Columb Major, hundred of Pyder, W. division of Cornwall, 36 miles (S. W. by W.) from Launceston; containing 107 inhabitants. The ancient name of this place was Modeshole, under which appellation John de Arundell, in 1301, certified his right to a market and fair here, which had been previously granted to Walter de Raleigh. The village is inconsiderable, consisting only of a few houses: a fair is held on October 25th, chiefly for sheep, of which from 3000 to 4000 are generally offered for sale. The borough, which first sent members to parliament in the reign of Edward VI., was disfranchised by the act of the 2nd of William IV., cap. 45: among its representatives, were Sir Walter Raleigh, and Carew, the historian.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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