Mettingham (All Saints)

METTINGHAM (All Saints), a parish, in the union and hundred of Wangford, E. division of Suffolk, 2 miles (E.) from Bungay; containing 409 inhabitants. In the 17th of Edward III., Sir John de Norwich had a licence to make a castle of his house here, in which he founded a chantry dedicated to God and the Virgin Mary. He also established a college at Raveningham, in Norfolk, in 1343, for a master and eight chaplains, which, in the 11th of Richard II., was removed to Norton-Subcourse, where the number of chaplains was augmented to thirteen, and which was again removed, in 1395, to the chapel of the Virgin in Mettingham Castle: at the Dissolution, the revenue amounted to £202. 7. 5. The parish is bounded on the north by the river Waveney, and situated on the road from Bungay to Beccles; it comprises 1401a. 1r. 4p. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £6. 17. 3½.; net income, £140; patron, the Rev. J. C. Safford. The church is chiefly in the later English style, with a circular tower; the font is curiously sculptured, and the entrance on the north is by a richly-decorated Norman doorway. About a mile southward of the church stand the stately remains of the castle, which appears to have been of great strength.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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