Marton

MARTON, a chapelry, in the parish of Poulton, union of the Fylde, hundred of Amounderness, N. division of Lancashire, 2 miles (S. E.) from Blackpool; containing 1562 inhabitants, of whom 935 are in Great, and 627 in Little, Marton. This place is mentioned in the Domesday survey under the name of Meretun, or "the town of the mere," and is chiefly remarkable for its moss and mere. Adam de Merton occurs in the Testa de Nevill as holding land here, and the Walters and Botilers or Butlers were anciently proprietors; the Fleetwoods subsequently became possessed of the estates of the Butlers in Great Marton. In the 4th of Edward III., Little Marton was held in trust for the convent of Furness by William de Cokerham, and at the dissolution of monasteries it appears to have passed to the Holcrofts. The estate, with other estates in Lytham, was purchased of Sir John Holcroft by the Clifton family, in 1606; and the whole of Little Marton, and the larger part of Great Marton, now belong to Thomas Clifton, Esq., of Lytham Hall. The moss extends about six miles in length from north to south, and one mile and a half in breadth. The mere was formerly very extensive, and a stream issuing from it turned the wheel of a watermill situated beyond the present windmill in Great Marton: the right of fishery on this lake was the subject of legal contest in the reign of Edward III. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £120; patron, the Vicar of Poulton. The impropriate tithes have been commuted for £506, and the vicarial for £84. The chapel, dedicated to St. Paul, was erected in 1801. A free school was founded in 1717 by James Baines, who endowed it with lands now producing £84 per annum; and a boys' and two girls' schools are supported.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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