Marston, Long (All Saints)

MARSTON, LONG (All Saints), a parish, in the W. division of Ainsty wapentake, W. riding of York, 7½ miles (W.) from York; containing, with the townships of Angram and Hutton-Wandesley, 649 inhabitants, of whom 446 are in the township of Long Marston. This place is memorable as the scene of the battle which occurred on the 2nd of July, 1644, upon Marston-Moor, between the royalists, commanded by Prince Rupert, and the parliamentarians under Cromwell, and which, after an obstinate and protracted conflict and considerable slaughter on both sides, terminated in the total defeat of the royal army, and the ultimate abandonment of York to the republican forces. The parish comprises 4260 acres, of which 2540 are in the township of Long Marston: the surface is generally flat, and the soil a stiff clay, alternated with portions of lighter quality and greater fertility; the lands are principally arable, and the system of cultivation is improved. The village, which is on the road to Wetherby, consists chiefly of irregularly built and scattered houses, and the surrounding scenery is pleasingly diversified. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £24. 3. 9.; net income, £865; patron, Lord Wenlock. A portion of the tithes was commuted for 371 acres of land in 1766; the rector has an old glebe of 39 acres, and receives a tithe rent-charge of £341. The church is an ancient structure in the decorated English style, repaired and repewed in 1810, with a square embattled tower.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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