Malling, South (St. Michael)

MALLING, SOUTH (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Lewes, hundred of Ringmer, rape of Pevensey, E. division of Sussex, 1 mile (N.) from Lewes; containing 646 inhabitants. It is bounded on the west by the river Ouse. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £105; patrons, the Courthope family; impropriators, the principal landowners. The church, described as collegiate in Domesday book, and said to have been founded by Ceadwalla, King of the West Saxons, who died in 668, is a small neat edifice, built on the site of the former, and consecrated May 23rd, 1632; it was repaired and repewed by subscription in 1837: the chancel contains an altar-tomb to the memory of Sir William and Lady Kemp. The dean and prebendaries forming the college possessed, at the Dissolution, a revenue of £45. 12. 5. The archbishops of Canterbury had a palace here, the chapel of which has been converted into a cottage. In December, 1836, an avalanche of snow fell upon the workhouse buildings here from a hill above, by which eight persons were killed. Richard Russell, M.D., whose treatise on the sea water of Brighton, laid the foundation of the prosperity of that place, was buried at South Malling.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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