Malborough

MALBOROUGH, a parish, in the union of Kingsbridge, hundred of Stanborough, Stanborough and Coleridge, and S. divisions of Devon, 4 miles (S. W. by S.) from Kingsbridge; containing, with the chapelry of Salcombe, 1951 inhabitants. This place is situated at the southern extremity of the county, on the coast of the English Channel. It was formerly defended by Ilton Castle, erected in 1336, of which there are some slight remains; and by another castle called Fort Charles, which, during the war in the reign of Charles I., was repaired by that monarch, at an expense of £3000, and was taken by the parliamentarian forces in 1645. The parish comprises 4635 acres, of which 1010 are waste, and the remainder arable and pasture; the soil is partly a white loam, partly red marl, and partly sand. The neighbourhood is remarkable for the mild temperature of its climate; and at Woodville, within the parish, lemon, orange, citron, and olive trees, flourish in the open air, requiring only temporary protection in very severe weather. The surface is hilly, and the scenery richly diversified. An estuary extends from Bolt Head, in the parish, to Kingsbridge quay, a distance of six miles. The Earl of Devon holds a court of admiralty here, the jurisdiction of which embraces an extensive line of coast. The living is annexed, with the livings of South Huish and South Milton, to the vicarage of West Alvington. The church, which has a spire, is situated on a commanding eminence near Bolt Head. A school is partly supported by the rent of parish lands.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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