Lyng (St. Clement)

LYNG (St. Clement), a parish, in the union of Mitford and Launditch, hundred of Eynsford, E. division of Norfolk, 7 miles (N. E. by E.) from East Dereham; containing, with the hamlet of Easthaugh, 601 inhabitants. This place, in the reign of Edward III., belonged to Sir John de Norwich, who had licence from that monarch to convert the manor-house into a castle; some of the foundations of the edifice are still remaining. The parish comprises 1899a. 2r. 22p., whereof 1459 acres are arable, 419 meadow and pasture, and 20 woodland. The village is situated on the south bank of the river Wensum, on which is an extensive paper-mill. A fair is held on the 20th of November. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £11, and in the gift of E. Lambe, Esq.: the incumbent's tithes have been commuted for £513. 10., and the glebe comprises 60 acres, with a house; a rent-charge of £11. 10. is payable to the rector of Elsing. The church is chiefly in the later English style, with a square embattled tower; the font is of Norman character, and there are some remains of ancient stained glass. Here is a place of worship for Wesleyans. At the inclosure of the parish, in 1808, 16 acres of heath were allotted to the poor for fuel. There was a religious house at Easthaugh, and some portions of the chapel, which was dedicated to St. Edmund, are still remaining.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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