Lyndhurst (St. Michael)

LYNDHURST (St. Michael), a parish, in the union, and N. division of the hundred, of New-Forest, Romsey and S. divisions of the county of Southampton, 9½ miles (W. by S.) from Southampton; containing 1380 inhabitants. Prior to the time of Charles II., the jurisdiction of the chief justice in eyre for the New Forest, in the centre of which the parish is situated, was exercised here, where the courts under the authority of the verderers are still held, some on such days as the presiding judges appoint, others on September 14th. Attached to the wardenship is a house called the King's House, now occupied by a subordinate officer, in which is preserved an ancient stirrup, said to have been used by William Rufus, at the time when he was shot by Sir Walter Tyrrel. The parish comprises 3618 acres, of which 2114 are common or waste; the soil of the cultivated portion exhibits the several varieties of clay, sand, and marl. There are numerous gentlemen's seats. Courts leet and baron for the hundred of Redbridge and manor of Lyndhurst are held. The living is annexed to the rectory of Minstead: the tithes have been commuted for £250. There is a place of worship for Baptists. A school is endowed with £26 per annum, arising from a bequest made by William Phillips, Esq.; and a national school is supported by subscription. Sir John Singleton Copley, on being elevated to the office of lord high chancellor, was created Baron Lyndhurst, by patent dated April 27th, 1827.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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