Lye, The

LYE, The, an ecclesiastical district, in the parish of Old Swinford, union of Stourbridge, Lower division of the hundred of Halfshire, county of Worcester, 2 miles (E.) from Stourbridge, on the road to Birmingham; containing about 6000 inhabitants. It comprises, with Wollescott, which lies within the district, 645 acres, whereof 240 are in the township of Lye: the surface is very much undulated, and the soil clayey. There are mines of coal and ironstone; and here is obtained the celebrated clay, called Stourbridge clay, for fire-bricks, crucibles, glass-house pots, gas-retorts, &c. The principal firms for these articles are, Messrs. Joseph and William King, Mr. Francis Rufford, Messrs. Davies and Hickman, and Mr. Richard Brettel. Immense quantities of nails are made, as also chain-cables, scythes, spades, anvils, vices, and similar articles; in these branches of manufacture the chief firms are, Messrs. T. and J. Pargeter, Wood Brothers, and Everson and Son. The church, dedicated to Christ, was erected in 1813, by the late Thomas Hill, Esq., of Dennis House, Staffordshire, at the cost of £10,000. The living, a perpetual curacy, was endowed by Mr. Hill with land producing £200 a year; he also built the parsonage-house: the Rev. Melsop Hill, M.A., grandson of the founder, is the present minister. There are places of worship for Baptists, Independents, and Wesleyans; and a national school, attached to the church, is supported by subscription.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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