Lullington (All Saints)

LULLINGTON (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Burton-upon-Trent, hundred of Repton and Gresley, S. division of the county of Derby, 7 miles (S.) from Burton; containing 650 inhabitants. The manor of "Lulletune" was in the Gresley family, in the reign of Edward I.; and the church was given by that family to the priory of Gresley, in the reign of Edward II. The parish is bounded by the river Maise on the south, and consists of the townships of Lullington and Coton-in-the-Elms, together comprising 2990a. 1r. 14p., whereof 1803a. 3r. 18p. are in Lullington township; of the latter, two-thirds are arable, and the remainder pasture, with a little wood. The soil of the parish is partly a marly and partly a sandy loam, on a red marly subsoil; the land is elevated, with extensive prospects, embracing Lichfield cathedral, Tamworth, &c. Charles Robert Colvile, Esq., is lord of the manor of Lullington, and owner of the township. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £4. 11. 10.; and in the patronage of the Crown; impropriators, Lady Sophia Des Voeux, Lady Wilmot Horton, and Mr. Colvile. The glebe consists of 56a. 3r. 23p., valued at £114 per annum; with a glebe-house. The church is an ancient structure, comprising a nave, chancel, tower, and spire; the last is high, and very peculiar. A neat school was built near the east end of the church, in 1843, by the lord of the manor, by whom it is also supported. Lullington is celebrated for the excellent quality of its cheese.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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