Luddenden

LUDDENDEN, a chapelry, in the parish and union of Halifax, wapentake of Morley, W. riding of York, 4½ miles (W. by N.) from Halifax. It comprises the township of Midgley, and the upper portion of that of Warley; the surface is boldly varied, rising into hills of lofty elevation, commanding extensive views, and the scenery is marked with features of rugged grandeur: stone of excellent quality is extensively quarried. The inhabitants are principally employed in various cotton, woollen, worsted, paper, and corn mills; and the Rochdale canal and the Leeds and Manchester railway, which latter runs past Luddenden-Foot parallel with the canal, afford facilities of conveyance. The chapel, dedicated to St. Mary, and rebuilt in 1821, at an expense of £3000, raised by subscription, is beautifully situated in a sequestered and romantic dell; it is a handsome structure in the later English style, with a square embattled tower crowned by pinnacles, and contains 1000 sittings. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Vicar of Halifax; net income, £150, with a parsonagehouse, built in 1841. There are places of worship for Independents, and Wesleyans of the Old and New Connexion. The Rev. Dr. Watkinson, curate, in 1752 bequeathed a house and several cottages in Leeds, and six cottages in Hunslet, all now producing £30 per annum, for distribution in bread to poor widows; he also presented a complete service of communion-plate of massive silver.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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