Lowton (St. Luke)

LOWTON (St. Luke), a parish, in the union of Leigh, hundred of West Derby, S. division of the county of Lancaster, 7 miles (N.) from Warrington; containing, with the township of Golborne, 3807 inhabitants. This place gave name to a family who subsequently adopted the surname of Kenyon from their possessions in a neighbouring township. An heiress of this family brought the estate to the Haydocks, and an heiress of the latter brought it to the Leghs. The Langtons and Fleetwoods have also been proprietors of land here. Lowton was formerly a township in the parish of Winwick, but was, with Golborne, formed into a separate parish by act of parliament in 1845. The parish comprises 3395 acres, of which 1825 are in Lowton township, one-seventh of the latter area being arable, and nearly all the remainder of it pasture; the surface is tolerably level, and the soil partly clay and partly loam. The Manchester and Liverpool railway runs on the south, and at Golborne is a station on the North-Union railway. The living is a rectory, with a net income of £250; patron, the Earl of Derby: the next presentation, however, will be exercised by the present Rector of Winwick, should a vacancy occur during his incumbency: there are 55 acres of glebe and a glebehouse. The tithes of Lowton township have been commuted for £107. The church, built in 1733 as a chapel, is a cruciform structure with a bell-tower. A school at Lowton, with a house for the master, is endowed with about three acres of land, called the School lands, producing £20 per annum; and about £60 per annum, arising from houses and land bequeathed by William Leadbeater in 1685, are distributed among the poor of Lowton and Golborne townships in equal portions.—See Golborne.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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