Longton

LONGTON, a chapelry, in the parish of Penwortham, union of Preston, hundred of Leyland, N. division of Lancashire, 5 miles (S. W. by W.) from Preston; containing 1719 inhabitants. This was one of the manors granted by Roger de Lacy, on obtaining the barony of Penwortham, to Robert, the brother of Hugh, last baron of the name of Bussel. In the 46th of Edward III., a portion of the manor belonged to the Lees, from whom it afterwards passed to the Flemings; and in the 9th of Henry IV., Sir Thomas Fleming gave to Henry de Bretherton and his heirs the whole lordship of Longton. The estate afterwards reverted to the Flemings, whose heiress, Elizabeth, in the reign of Henry VIII. married Thurstan Hall. The chapelry comprises 3132 acres, of which 146 are common or waste land; its length from east to west, is much greater than its breadth, and there is a long and considerable village, through which passes the road from Preston to Ormskirk: the Ribble flows on the west. Longton Hall, built in the 17th century, is now a farmhouse. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £148; patron, L. Rawstorne, Esq. The tithes have been commuted for £328 payable to the impropriator, and £8 to the curate of Penwortham. The chapel was in existence in 1650, and, having fallen into decay, was rebuilt in 1770, by a brief, dated in 1767, amounting to £1026. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. A free school was endowed in 1793, by Robert Moss, with a bequest of £400; it is further aided by the trustees of Hutton school: the present schoolroom was built by subscription in 1817.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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