London-Colney

LONDON-COLNEY, a chapelry, in the union of St. Alban's, parishes of St. Peter and St. Alban's, hundred of Cashio, or liberty of St. Alban's, county of Hertford, 6 miles (N. W. by N.) from Barnet. This place derives its name from its situation on the road to London, which crosses the river Colne here, by a substantial brick bridge of seven arches. The living is a perpetual curacy, with a net income of £82, and an excellent glebe-house; it is in the patronage of the Countess of Caledon, to whom also the impropriation belongs. The chapel is a handsome edifice in the later English style, dedicated to St. Peter, erected by subscription, and grants of £400 from the Parliamentary Commissioners and £500 from the Incorporated Society; the site was given by the Earl of Hardwicke, who settled £40 per annum towards the support of the minister. A national school was built by the late Earl of Caledon, and endowed with £20 per annum by the Countess Dowager of Hardwicke.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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