Loddon (Holy Trinity)

LODDON (Holy Trinity), a market-town and parish, and the head of the union of Loddon and Clavering, in the hundred of Loddon, E. division of Norfolk, 10 miles (S. E.) from Norwich, and 113 (N. E.) from London; containing 1197 inhabitants. This place, which gives name to the hundred, is situated on the road from Norwich to Beccles, and on the banks of an inconsiderable stream called the Chet, which flows from the neighbourhood of Howe into the Yare at Hardly cross; it consists of one street, the inhabitants of which are well supplied with water. Malting is carried on to a small extent. The market is on Tuesday; and there are fairs on Easter-Monday, and on Nov. 25th for horses. The county magistrates hold petty-sessions every fortnight at the Swan inn, and a court baron is held at the will of the lord of the manor. The parish comprises 2988 acres, of which 2303 are arable, 615 pasture, and 70 wood. The living is a vicarage; patron and appropriator, the Bishop of Ely: the great tithes have been commuted for £520, the vicarial for £300, and the glebe comprises 4 acres. The church, erected at the expense of Sir James Hobart, chief justice of the court of common pleas in the reign of Henry VII., is a fine edifice of stone, in the later English style, with a lofty embattled tower; the font, now much defaced, was formerly very beautiful. There are places of worship for Wesleyans and Primitive Methodists. A national school has been established; and about £100 per annum, derived from 80 acres of land, are applied to the repairs of the church, and to the relief of the poor. The union comprises 42 parishes or places, containing a population of 14,472.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

Navigation

Preface
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z