Lockwood

LOCKWOOD, a chapelry, in the parish of Almondbury, union of Huddersfield, Upper division of the wapentake of Agbrigg, W. riding of York, 1½ mile (S. W.) from Huddersfield; containing 4182 inhabitants. It comprises by computation nearly 1700 acres; the soil is fertile, and the substratum abounds with stone of good quality for building and other purposes. The village, which forms a rural suburb to the town of Huddersfield, is beautifully situated in the vale of the river Holme, near its confluence with another tributary of the Colne, and on the road to Sheffield; it is extensive and well built, and contains an hotel for the accommodation of persons visiting the spa in its immediate vicinity. Lockwood Spa, erected in 1827, in a deeplysequestered spot, sheltered by a lofty and well-wooded ridge on the east side of the river, is a handsome range of building, comprising warm, tepid, vapour, cold, and shower baths, with a large swimming-bath, and every requisite arrangement for the internal and external use of the water. The manufacture of woollen-cloths, and the weaving of fancy goods, are carried on extensively in the township; and there is a large brewery, established in 1790. The chapel, now a district church, dedicated to Emmanuel, was erected in 1830, at a cost of £3000, by the Parliamentary Commissioners, on a site given by Sir John Ramsden; it is a handsome structure in the later English style, with a campanile turret, and contains 920 sittings, of which 400 are free. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Vicar of Almondbury, with a net income of £150. A residence for the incumbent has been erected at the expense of John Brooke, Esq., of Armitage-Bridge Hall. There are places of worship for Baptists and Wesleyans.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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