Llanymynech (St. Agatha)

LLANYMYNECH (St. Agatha), a parish, partly in the hundred of Chirk, county of Denbigh, North Wales, but chiefly in the hundred of Oswestry, N. division of Salop, 6 miles (S. by W.) from Oswestry; the English portion containing 566 inhabitants. Here commences the principal limestone range of North Wales, originating in an abruptly precipitous elevation of 900 feet, and extending northward through the country. In the rocks are found sulphate and carbonate of lead, copper, zinc of superior quality, and a green dusty ore of copper, called by the miners "copper malm." Great quantities of limestone are burnt, and calamine is procured in abundance. The curious ancient mining level here, called the "Ogo," consists of caverns of unequal form and dimensions, connected by veins of ore which serve as guides to the miners. A branch of the Ellesmere canal from Frankton reaches to this place, where it joins the Montgomeryshire canal; and a railway has been formed, extending from the limestone-rocks for nearly two miles and a half, and communicating with these canals, the latter of which crosses the river Vyrnwy by an aqueduct. Offa's Dyke passes through the parish, near the church, to the precipitous rock above noticed, and thence towards Oswestry. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £12. 13. 4.; net income, £394; patron, the Bishop of St. Asaph.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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