Llanyblodwell (St. Michael)

LLANYBLODWELL (St. Michael), a parish, in the hundred of Oswestry, N. division of Salop, 6 miles (S. W. by S.) from Oswestry, on the road into Wales; containing 961 inhabitants. It comprises 4676a. 3r. 32p., about two-thirds of which are arable, and the remainder pasture, with the exception of about 100 acres of common, and nearly the same quantity of woodland; the soil is clay and gravel. The small meandering river Tannat, famed for its trout, flows through the parish; and Offa's Dyke bounds it on the east. Limestone of the finest quality is extensively quarried in the hills of Porthywaen and Crickheath, which, with the hill of Llanymynech, form the beautiful valley in which the village is situated, and commence the range of wild and rugged scenery extending to the stupendous Berwyn, in North Wales. Copper and lead ore abound, though no regular mines of either seem to have been wrought since the time of the Romans, of whose works there are considerable traces in this and the adjoining parishes. In the township of Llynclys, a name derived from Llyn, a lake, and Llys, a palace, is a lake of extraordinary depth, covering seven or eight acres, and surrounded by striking scenery. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £7. 12. 1., and in the gift of the Bishop of St. Asaph: the great tithes have been commuted for £201, and the vicarial for £34. 12.; there is a glebe-house and the vicar's glebe contains 20 acres. The church, a plain structure, with a small wooden turret rising from the west end, contains handsome monuments to the Bridgeman and Godolphin families. Moreton chapel, a brick edifice, was built and endowed, as is supposed, by an ancestor of the Earl of Bradford.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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