Llanover (St. Bartholomew)

LLANOVER (St. Bartholomew), a parish, in the division of Pont-y-Pool, union and hundred of Abergavenny, county of Monmouth, 3½ miles (S. by E.) from Abergavenny, on the road to Pont-y-Pool; containing 3123 inhabitants, of whom 2801 are in the Higher, and 322 in the Lower, division. On the northeast, the parish is bounded by the river Usk; and the Brecon and Monmouthshire canal intersects it from north to south. Its western portion consists of mountainous ground, and its eastern of a highly undulated surface, the former presenting some extensive and pleasing views. The Blaenavon iron-works, and the forges of Wartag, are in the parish; at the former is a chapel, and there is another at Chapel-Nywydd. Llanover Court, the seat of Sir B. Hall, Bart., is a noble mansion of Bath stone, in the Elizabethan style, situated in a small park. The living is a discharged vicarage, with the livings of Mamhilad and Trevethan united, valued in the king's books at £15. 3. 6½., and in the patronage of the Bishop, Archdeacon, and Chapter of Llandaff, the appropriators; net income, £591. The great tithes of Llanover have been commuted for £145, and the small for £247: the vicar has 16 acres of glebe. The church is ancient. There is a place of worship for Independents; also a school endowed by Mrs. Sarah Hopkins with £3000 in the 4½ per cents., and a small farm at Blaenavon, the rent of which is £20 per annum.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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