Llangibby (St. Cuby)

LLANGIBBY (St. Cuby), a parish, in the union of Pont-y-Pool, division of Caerleon, hundred of Usk, county of Monmouth, 2¼ miles (S. by W.) from Usk; containing 535 inhabitants. It is memorable as the scene of a sanguinary battle between the Britons and the Saxons: a great number of the latter were slain; and the place near which the battle occurred is still, in memory of the event, called Graig Saisson. The parish comprises 4443a. 3r. 19p.; about 1805 acres are arable, 2137 pasture, and 462 woodland. The surface, near the river Usk, which skirts the parish on the east, is level, but the land rises in gentle undulations in other parts, commanding views of the Bristol Channel; the scenery is finely embellished with wood. The soil in some parts is a rich loam, and in others clay, alternated with lighter mould; the substratum abounds with limestone, which is burnt for manure, and there are some quarries of sandstone. The petty-sessions for the division are held in the village, alternately with Panteague. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £19. 10. 10., and in the gift of W. A. Williams, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £504. 7. 6., and the glebe comprises 75 acres. The church is in the early English style. There are places of worship for Baptists and Wesleyans. Sir Roger Williams, Knt., distinguished in the reign of Elizabeth; and Sir Trevor Williams, Bart., whose valiant defence of his castle at Llangibby is on record; were both natives of the parish.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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