Liverton

LIVERTON, a chapelry, in the parish of Easingtonin-Cleveland, union of Guisborough, E. division of the liberty of Langbaurgh, N. riding of York, 7½ miles (E. by N.) from Guisborough; containing 203 inhabitants. This place, which at the time of the Domesday survey was a barren and unprofitable waste, was granted by the Conqueror to Robert de Brus, lord of Skelton, from whose descendants it passed, through the family of Thweng, to the Latimers, Willoughbys, and others; it is now chiefly the property of Viscount Downe, who is lord of the manor. The chapelry comprises 2393 acres, of which a very considerable portion is high moorland. The village is situated about midway between the sea and the road from Whitby to Guisborough, and consists chiefly of houses irregularly scattered along the edge of a common. The advowson belonged to the priory of Guisborough, to which it was given by Henry Fitzconan. The chapel is a small ancient structure, with a well-preserved Saxon arch.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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