Linton (St. Nicholas)

LINTON (St. Nicholas), a parish, in the union and hundred of Maidstone, lathe of Aylesford, W. division of Kent, 4 miles (S.) from Maidstone; containing 900 inhabitants. This parish comprises by measurement 1383 acres, of which 633 are arable, 420 meadow and pasture, 170 in hop plantations, 100 garden and orchard, and 60 woodland; the surface is boldly undulated, and the scenery pleasing. The village is situated on the range of hills that bound the Weald on the north; and within half a mile of it is Coxheath, an extensive plain, on which 15,000 soldiers were encamped, and reviewed by George III., in 1778, but which has been inclosed and cultivated, now producing hops of excellent quality. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £7. 13. 4.; patron and impropriator, Earl Cornwallis: the great tithes have been commuted for £220, and the vicarial for £325. The church contains some monuments worthy of notice, particularly one to the memory of Viscount Brome, only son of the present Earl Cornwallis. During a thunder-storm about the end of November, 1838, the spire was struck by the electric fluid, which destroyed a part of it. In 1813, John Bowles bequeathed £200, the interest to be applied to instruction. A schoolhouse for girls was lately erected by Lady Cornwallis; and some handsome almshouses have been built and endowed by his lordship, whose seat is in the parish. The poor-house for Maidstone union, a large brick building, calculated to hold 600 paupers, with a spacious chapel attached, is situated here.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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