Linthwaite

LINTHWAITE, a chapelry, in the parish of Almondbury, union of Huddersfield, Upper division of the wapentake of Agbrigg, W. riding of York, 4 miles (S. W. by W.) from Huddersfield; containing 2710 inhabitants. The chapelry consists of the chief part of the township of Linthwaite, and a small portion of that of South Crossland. The township of Linthwaite is on the Huddersfield and Manchester road, between the two branches of the river Colne; and comprises by computation 1300 acres. The inhabitants are chiefly employed in the numerous factories established for the manufacture of woollen-cloth, which is carried on to a great extent; and there are several large quarries of stone for building and other purposes. Facility of conveyance is afforded by the Manchester canal, which passes through the township. The chapel, now a district church, dedicated to Christ, was erected in 1828, at an expense of £3000, raised by subscription, aided by the Parliamentary Commissioners; it is a handsome structure in the later English style, with a square embattled tower surmounted by a spire, and contains 800 sittings, of which 200 are free. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Vicar of Almondbury, with a net income of £150; impropriators, the Governors of Clitheroe grammar school. There are places of worship for Baptists and Wesleyans.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

Navigation

Preface
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z