Linford, Great (St. Andrew)

LINFORD, GREAT (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Newport-Pagnell, hundred of Newport, county of Buckingham, 1¾ mile (W. S. W.) from Newport-Pagnell; containing 474 inhabitants. The parish is situated on the Ouse, and comprises 1787a. 2r. 6p., of which 371 acres are arable, 1185 pasture, 118 meadow on the banks of the river, and 78 woodland. Its substratum contains limestone, which is quarried chiefly for repairing the roads: a layer of firmer texture, at a greater depth, impervious to atmospheric influence, might be worked for building purposes. Many of the females are employed in making bobbin-lace. The Grand Junction canal, and the Newport-Pagnell branch, both pass through the parish; and the Wolverton station on the London and Birmingham railway is within two miles. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £20. 0. 2½., and in the gift of H. A. Uthwatt, Esq., lord of the manor: the tithes have been commuted for £400, and the glebe comprises 27½ acres. The church is a neat structure in the later English style, with a north porch, the roof of which is elegantly groined. There is a place of worship for Independents. In 1702, Sir William Pritchard bequeathed a rent-charge of £24 in support of an almshouse for six persons, and another of £10 for instruction; and Lady Pritchard subsequently left a sum of money for apprenticing boys, and clothing the almspeople. In the clay formation on which the parish is situated, are found various fossils; and on the lands of Mr. Uthwatt, is a copious spring strongly impregnated with sulphuretted hydrogen gas, similar in its properties to the Harrogate water. Dr. Richard Sandy, otherwise Napier, presented to the rectory in 1589, was held in superstitious reverence for his skill in the sciences of physic and astrology.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

Navigation

Preface
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z