Lindley cum Quarmby

LINDLEY cum Quarmby, a chapelry, in the parish and union of Huddersfield, Upper division of the wapentake of Agbrigg, W. riding of York, 2 miles (N. W.) from Huddersfield; containing 2881 inhabitants. The chapelry comprises 1403a. 1r. 28p., of which about 30 acres are woodland, and the remainder, with a trifling exception, pasture; the surface is elevated, commanding views of Huddersfield and the surrounding country. The substratum abounds with good buildingstone, which is extensively quarried. The village is large and well built, and the inhabitants are chiefly employed in the woollen manufacture, for which there are four large establishments. A district church, dedicated to St. Stephen, was erected in 1830, at an expense of £2700, by the Parliamentary Commissioners; it is a handsome structure in the later English style, and contains 800 sittings, of which one-half are free. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £164, with an excellent glebe-house in the Elizabethan style, erected in 1838, at an expense of £1200; patron, the Vicar of Huddersfield. The site for the church and cemetery was given by John Thornhill, Esq., lord of the manor. There are places of worship for Baptists, Kilhamites, and Wesleyans.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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