Lewannick (St. Martin)

LEWANNICK (St. Martin), a parish, in the union of Launceston, N. division of the hundred of East, E. division of Cornwall, 5 miles (S. W. by W.) from Launceston; containing 733 inhabitants. This parish, which is bounded on the north and north-east by the river Inny, comprises by measurement 4000 acres, whereof 176 are common or waste; the surface is hilly, and the scenery in many parts interesting. The soil is various, in some places a rich loam, and in others lighter; a considerable portion is in pasture, and large herds of cattle, chiefly of the North Devon breed, are reared. The substratum abounds with stone of superior quality for building and other uses: at Pollyfont is a quarry of remarkably fine freestone, which is also used for mantel-pieces, and, when polished, is of a rich green colour with black veins; there is also a quarry of exceedingly hard slate in the parish. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £7. 18. 9., and in the patronage of the Crown: the impropriate tithes, belonging to Miss Hockin, have been commuted for £225, and the vicarial for £185; the glebe is valued at £60 per annum. The church is a handsome structure in the later English style, with a lofty embattled tower crowned by pinnacles. There are places of worship for Baptists, Bryanites, Independents, and Wesleyans.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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