Lees

LEES, a hamlet, in the parish and union of Ashton-under-Lyne, hundred of Salford, S. division of the county of Lancaster, 8½ miles (N. E. by E.) from Manchester, and 2 (E. S. E.) from Oldham, on the road to Huddersfield. This place is in the northern portion of Knott-Lanes, and so situated as to be more connected, locally, with Oldham than Ashton-under-Lyne. A part of the village, which is of some extent, is in Oldham chapelry, and another portion in Saddleworth, Yorkshire; the houses have been for the most part built within the last eighty years, and now number about 600. The population is chiefly employed in the numerous factories in the immediate vicinity, the establishment of which has given importance to the place. A literary society was formed in 1840. Fairs are held in the spring and autumn. The living of Lees is a curacy, net income, £150; patron, the Rector of Ashton. The chapel, dedicated to St. John, is a neat edifice of stone, erected in 1742. An ecclesiastical parish, named St. Thomas, Leesfield, was formed in 1846, by the Ecclesiastical Commission, out of the parish of Ashton and the parochial chapelry of Oldham: the living is a perpetual curacy, in the alternate gift of the Crown and the Bishop of Manchester, with a net income of £150. The church cost £5000, and is a neat building with a square tower. There are several places of worship for dissenters. Near the village is a chalybeate spring, called Lea Spa.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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