Lazonby (St. Nicholas)

LAZONBY (St. Nicholas), a parish, in the union of Penrith, Leath ward, E. division of Cumberland; containing, with the chapelry of Plumpton-Wall, 891 inhabitants, of whom 570 are in the township of Lazonby, 7 miles (N. N. E.) from Penrith. The township comprises 7980a. 1r. 17p., of which 3888a. 2r. 20p. are arable, 1140a. 2r. 35p. wood and plantations, 62a. 2r. 7p. meadow and pasture, and 2888a. 1r. 35p. waste. The village is situated on the west bank of the river Eden, and the surrounding country is pleasing. There are good quarries of freestone, and a quarry producing stone for millstones. The living is a vicarage, endowed with a portion of the rectorial tithes, and valued in the king's books at £13. 1. 3.; net income, £551; patron, the Bishop of Carlisle: the remainder of the rectorial tithes belong to the poor of the chapelry of Witherslack, Westmorland. At Plumpton-Wall is a separate incumbency. In Baron Wood is a lofty rock, containing an artificial cave called Giant's Chamber, or Samson's Cave. The great Roman road passes from north to south, and another intersects the parish in a direction towards Salkeld Gate. At Castle Rigg are the ruins of a moated building; and upon the fell, urns containing bones and ashes were discovered some years since. There are also several cairns.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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