Lavington, West, or Bishop's-Lavington (All Saints)

LAVINGTON, WEST, or Bishop's-Lavington (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Devizes, hundred of Potterne and Cannings, Devizes and N. divisions of Wilts, 1½ mile (S. W. by S.) from East Lavington; containing 1595 inhabitants. This place was for many generations the property of the Dauntsey family, of whom William Dauntsey, a younger son, was alderman of London in 1542; it became the property of Sir John Danvers, by marriage with the grand-daughter and heiress of Sir John Dauntsey, Knt., and was subsequently disposed of to a late Duke of Marlborough. The village suffered greatly from a destructive fire in 1689. The parish is situated on the road from Devizes to Salisbury, and comprises some very rich land, a portion being laid out in market-gardens, from which large quantities of excellent vegetables are sent to Bath, Salisbury, and other places. A soft chalkstone is quarried, and burnt into lime; blocks of green sandstone are frequently raised for building; and on the downs, considerable quantities of flints are dug for roadmending. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £11. 16. 3.; patron and appropriator, the Bishop of Salisbury. The great tithes have been commuted for £1325, and the vicarial for £360; the glebe comprises 17 acres. The church is an ancient and spacious structure, in the early English style, with a square embattled tower; it contains the sepulchral chapel of the Dauntsey family, a beautiful specimen of the later English style. The above-mentioned William Dauntsey founded and endowed an almshouse, and a grammar school, the latter of which is open to all children of the parish. The neighbourhood abounds with tumuli, camps, and other relics.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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