Lannarth

LANNARTH, an ecclesiastical parish, in the parish of Gwennap, union of Redruth, E. division of the hundred of Kerrier, W. division of Cornwall, 1½ mile (S. S. E.) from Redruth; containing nearly 3000 inhabitants. This parish was constituted in Nov. 1844, under the provisions of the act 6th and 7th Victoria, cap. 37. It is about two miles in length and nearly the same in breadth, and of hilly surface, with one principal vale, sometimes called the "Comb," thickly inhabited, and presenting a picturesque and pleasing aspect from the neighbouring hills, some of which, being disfigured by mining operations, form a striking contrast to the valley. Through the whole length of this valley, which is the middle of the parish, runs the main road from Redruth to Falmouth. Here are ten copper-mines, the principal of which is the Tresavean, one of the deepest mines in the county, and perhaps in the world, reaching 340 fathoms below the surface. The steam-engines of this mine are on a most extensive scale, one of them being of 240-horse power and 12-feet stroke, setting in motion 350 tons, raising a weight of 107,000 lbs., and discharging at every stroke 49 gallons of water. There is also an engine, vulgarly called the "man engine," used for lowering and taking up the miners, and thus saving them the fatigue caused by ladders; it is the only one of the kind in the county.

The church is a plain but neat structure, and internally very convenient; it was built in 1829, and previously to its consecration in 1845, was used as a licensed place of worship: it is now called Christ Church. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £150; patrons, the Crown and the Bishop of Exeter, alternately; incumbent, the Rev. John Tucker. A parsonage-house has been erected, in the walls of which the incumbent has deposited some stone jars containing ecclesiastical records, which perhaps, some centuries hence, may possess value and interest. There are three places of worship for Methodists, each of a different section of that body. The derivations of names of places in the parish, are worthy of notice: Trevarth is derived from the old Cornish words Tre, a town, and varth, high, "the higher town;" Pennance from Pen, the head-land, and nance, the vale, "the head of the valley;" Tresavean, from Tresa, the third, and vean, little, "the third little town;" and Lannarth, from Lan, a church, and narth, or varth, (the n being substituted for the v, for the sake of euphony), "the higher church." The Chapel hill is close by, but not a vestige of any building remains.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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