Langton, Herring

LANGTON, HERRING, a parish, in the union of Weymouth, hundred of Uggscombe, Dorchester division of Dorset, 5 miles (N. W. by W.) from Weymouth; containing 260 inhabitants. This place, which suffered much from an inundation of the sea in Nov. 1824, is bounded on the south-west by the Back-water, which separates it from the remarkable tongue of land called the Chesil Bank: the Back-water is covered with a profusion of aquatic birds of every kind, and there are not less than 100 swans on it, the property of the Earl of Ilchester. The parish comprises 902 acres, of which 320 are common; the soil is generally clay, alternated with sand, but beds of shells to a considerable depth abound in various places, and there no soil of any kind is found. The surface is hilly, and the surrounding scenery is characterised by features rather of boldness than of beauty. Here are some quarries of limestone, and granite of excellent quality is found. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £7. 2. 11., and in the alternate patronage of the Crown in right of the duchy of Cornwall, and Isaac Sparks, Esq.; net income, £126. The church has been enlarged.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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