Langstone

LANGSTONE, a parish, in the union of Newport, division of Christchurch, hundred of Caldicot, county of Monmouth, 4½ miles (E. by N.) from Newport; containing, with the chapelry of Llanbeder, 220 inhabitants. The parish comprises by computation 1200 acres, of which 350 are arable, 800 pasture, and 50 woodland. The soil in the southern and western portions is chiefly clay, resting upon limestone, and in the northern and eastern of a light sandy quality. Llanbeder comprises about 200 acres. The scenery is beautifully diversified, and the northern part of the parish, through which runs the road from Chepstow to Newport, commands a fine view of the Severn, and the counties of Devon and Somerset. Limestone is quarried for burning, and also for tomb-stones and paving. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £4. 1. 0½.; net income, £158; patrons, the family of Gore: the glebe comprises 50 acres. The church is an ancient structure, partly in the early English style.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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