Langley, King's (All Saints)

LANGLEY, KING'S (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Hemel-Hempstead, hundred of Dacorum, county of Hertford, 19 miles (W. S. W.) from Hertford; containing, with the hamlet of Chipperfield, 1629 inhabitants. A priory, or house for friars-preachers, was founded here by Roger, son of Robert Helle or Helke, aud afterwards enlarged and more liberally endowed by the munificence of the kings Edward I., II., III., and IV.; it possessed, in the 26th of Henry VIII., a revenue of £150. 14. 8. Queen Mary restored it for a prioress and nuns, but it was totally suppressed in the 1st of Elizabeth. The parish comprises 3461 acres, of which 182 are common or waste. A paper manufactory affords employment to about 50 persons. The Grand Junction canal passes through the parish: in excavating for it, a human skeleton and jawbones, of gigantic size, were found in 1820, and an ancient sword and a spear in 1822. Here, also, is a station on the London and Birmingham railway. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £8; patron and appropriator, the Bishop of Ely: the appropriate tithes have been commuted for £600, and the vicarial for £220; the appropriate glebe comprises 95 acres, and the vicarial 5 acres. The church is of flint and stone, with a square embattled tower surmounted by a short spire, and has been enlarged, and galleries built; it contains the tomb of Edmund de Langley, fifth son of Edward III., and Duke of York, who was born at a royal palace here, and was buried in 1402, in the church of the priory, from which, at the Dissolution, his tomb was removed to the parish church. A few years since, a chapel was erected and endowed by subscription at Chipperfield common, where the poor are occasionally christened and buried.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

Navigation

Preface
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z