Langley

LANGLEY, a township, and ecclesiastical district, in the parish of Hales-Owen, union of Bromsgrove, Upper division of the hundred of Halfshire, Hales-Owen and E. divisions of the county of Worcester, 5 miles (W. by S.) from Birmingham; containing about 2700 inhabitants, of whom 802 are in the township. This district was constituted in January, 1846, under the provisions of the act 6th and 7th Victoria, cap. 37. It comprises about 473 acres, the Wolverhampton level of the Worcester canal being its northern boundary. The surface, formerly agricultural and pretty, is now defaced by mounds, and the smoke of coal and ironstone mines, and brick-kilns: there are also chemical-works, and many of the inhabitants are nailers. The Hales-Owen and Birmingham road runs through. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Crown and the Bishop of Worcester, alternately. A church is in course of erection, the cost of which is estimated at £2500; a parsonage-house will also be built, at an expense of £1000, and it is proposed to erect national schools. There are places of worship for Independents and Wesleyans.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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