Langcliffe

LANGCLIFFE, a township, in the parish of Giggleswick, union of Settle, W. division of the wapentake of Staincliffe, W. riding of the county of York, 1 mile (N.) from Settle; containing 664 inhabitants. The township lies in a beautiful and fertile valley, bounded by Stackhouse and Langcliffe Scaurs, and comprises by computation 1890 acres, including part of Winskill hamlet. The lands are divided among several proprietors, and the population is chiefly employed in the cotton and paper manufactures; two large cottonmills are situated on the banks of the Ribble, in the neighbourhood, and a paper-mill likewise stands on that river. Langcliffe was parcel of the possessions of Sawley Abbey, and subsequently for a century and a half the property of the Dawsons, a family highly distinguished in point of alliances and personal desert. Whitaker gives a copy of verses, printed in 1690, by William Dawson, containing an account of a village destroyed by the Scots in the reign of Edward II., and supposed to be the parent of the present village; in confirmation of which, foundations of houses under Winskill have been met with, when draining some lands there In the village is a school-house, licensed by the Bishop of Ripon for divine service. Roman coins have occasionally been discovered.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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