Lane-Bridge

LANE-BRIDGE, an ecclesiastical district, in the parochial chapelry, and union, of Burnley, parish of Whalley, Higher division of the hundred of Blackburn, N. division of Lancashire; containing about 2300 inhabitants. This district was constituted in Sept. 1845, under the provisions of the act 6 and 7 Victoria, cap. 37, and named St. Paul's. It is formed of the southeastern part of the township of Habergham-Eaves, and is bounded on the north-east by the West Calder river; having an area of about four square miles. The surface is uneven, high to the south, and sloping into the valley on which Burnley is built, on the north, and on the east to the valley of Townley Park. The roads from Burnley to Todmorden and Edenfield pass through portions of the district, and the Leeds and Liverpool canal through its northern part. There are coal-mines, five cottonfactories, a woollen-factory, two iron-foundries, a number of workshops of different kinds, and also the gasworks belonging to Burnley. Townley Hall is situated here; its fine woods, principally of ancient oak, forming the great ornament of the district. Divine service is at present performed in a school-house lately built: the style of the intended church will be Roman, the shape cruciform, and the cost is estimated at between £2000 and £3000. The living is in the gift of the Crown and the Bishop of Manchester, alternately. There is a Roman Catholic chapel; also a school, opened at Easter, 1847, in which as many as 512 children can receive instruction. Some mineral wells have appeared, but from the excavations of the coal-mines they are now entirely lost.— See Habergham-Eaves.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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