Kyme, South (All Saints)

KYME, SOUTH (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Sleaford, wapentake of Flaxwell, parts of Kesteven, county of Lincoln, 8½ miles (S. W. by S.) from Tattershall; containing, with the township of North Kyme, 942 inhabitants. This parish, which is situated on that part of the Sleaford navigation called Kyme Eau, derived its name from the Kyme family, who were barons by tenure and writ in the reign of Stephen, and had a seat here, mentioned by Leland as a "goodly house and park," of which only the tower now remains. A priory of Black canons was founded in honour of the virgin Mary, in the reign of Henry II.; it was valued at the Dissolution at £138. 4. 9. The parish comprises 8370 acres. An act was passed in 1840 for the more effectual draining of the lands. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £99; patron, Earl Brownlow. The church formed part of the priory, and was a large fabric, but in 1805, it was mostly taken down, and now consists of only one aisle, with a south porch; an arch at the west end covers the bell. Marmaduke Dickenson, in 1711, bequeathed £200, since invested in land producing £45 per annum, to be distributed among the poor. Sir Gilbert Talbois, created Baron of Kyme in the reign of Henry VIII., and who died without issue in 1536, is interred in the church.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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