Knott-Lanes

KNOTT-LANES, a division, in the parish and union of Ashton-under-Lyne, hundred of Salford, S. division of the county of Lancaster, 5¼ miles (N. E. by E.) from Manchester; containing 5521 inhabitants. The division consists of the northern and central parts of the parish. It claims antiquity for its name as high as the time of Canute, the Dane, who is said to have halted here on his march from the western to the eastern coast: Knott is inferred to be a corruption of Nute, an abbreviation of Canute. Several of the old Lanes are narrow and winding, and being in many parts overhung with trees, their appearance is romantic. There are a few ancient and some good modern residences, among the former of which may be mentioned, Bardsley House, once the seat of a family of the same name; Taunton Hall, the seat of the Claytons as early as the reign of Henry VI.; and Alt-Hill, the former abode of the family of Lees. This division, the centre of which is about three miles north of the town of Ashton, comprises about 1030 customary acres of land; and contains several small villages and hamlets, whose population is employed in cotton spinning and weaving, and in collieries. The Fairbottom canal, here, is of great advantage in the conveyance of coal. An episcopal chapel is situated at Lees, or Hey, a village in the extreme northern portion of the district; and there are some schools, one of which, connected with the chapel, has a small endowment.—See Bardsley and Lees.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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