Knottingly

KNOTTINGLY, a township, in the parish of Pontefract, Upper division of the wapentake of Osgoldcross, W. riding of York, 1¼ mile (E. S. E.) from Ferry-Bridge; containing 4304 inhabitants. This township, which is situated on the navigable river Aire, comprises by measurement 1536 acres; the soil is fertile, and the surrounding scenery in many points romantic. The substratum is chiefly limestone, of excellent quality both for building and for burning into lime, and large quantities are quarried and sent off for the supply of distant parts, both in blocks and when converted into lime. On the banks of the Aire are the King's Mills, erected soon after the Conquest, and which, though under other circumstances, are still in use. The village is well built, on the south bank of the Aire, near its junction with the Knottingly and Goole canal; and consists of several streets, and ranges of houses in detached situations. There are a few houses in the Elizabethan style of architecture, and evidently of that date; and a fine old Hall has recently been pulled down, to get at the limestone beneath. Here are some malting-houses and a very large brewery; a pottery in which earthenware of every description is manufactured, affording employment to more than 200 persons; another, on a smaller scale, in which about 60 persons are engaged; a tobacco-pipe manufactory on a large scale, a considerable tannery, several roperies, and various other establishments. The trade is much facilitated by the river and canal: the canal was formed by the Aire and Calder Navigation Company, by whom, also, the river was rendered more serviceable. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £129; patron, the Vicar of Pontefract. The chapel, dedicated to St. Botolph, is an ancient edifice of brick, with a campanile turret, and is now appropriated to the western part of the township. The eastern part was made an ecclesiastical district, called East Knottingly, in 1846, under the provisions of the act 6th and 7th Victoria, cap. 37; and a church, dedicated to Christ, is in course of erection, of which the estimated cost is £2000: it is a cruciform structure in the early English style, and will accommodate 800 persons. The living is in the gift of the Crown and the Archbishop of York, alternately. There are places of worship for Independents, Primitive Methodists, and Wesleyans. Near the Swan inn is an ancient house, formerly a convent.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

Navigation

Preface
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z