Kniveton (St. John the Baptist)

KNIVETON (St. John the Baptist), a parish, in the hundred of Wirksworth, S. division of the county of Derby, 3 miles (N. E.) from Ashbourn; on the road to Matlock; containing 326 inhabitants. The manor of "Cheniveton," so called in the Domesday survey, was from a very early period the property of the Kniveton family, and was sold by Sir Andrew Kniveton, Bart., in the reign of Charles I., to the family of Lowe; it afterwards passed to the Pegges, and others. The parish comprises 1947 acres of fertile land, principally on limestone, and occupied as dairy-farms; the surface is undulated, and the scenery picturesque: there are two limestone-quarries. The village, which is considerable, is well built. The living is a perpetual curacy, net income, £64; patron, J. Harrison, Esq., of Snelston Hall. The church is at the highest point and the south extremity of the village: it was erected about the close of the 13th century, and was lately restored, with open seats; it has a low tower and small spire. Two places of worship have been built by the dissenters, but one only is now used, by the Primitive Methodists. In 1715, John Hurd endowed a school with £8 per annum; but the premises for it not having been built agreeably to the will of the founder, or suitably to the wants of the parish, a new house has recently been erected, with assistance from the National Society and the Committee of Council on Education.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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