Kirkby-Moorside (All Saints)

KIRKBY-MOORSIDE (All Saints), a market-town and parish, in the union of Helmsley, wapentake of Ryedale, N. riding of York; containing, with the townships of Fadmoor, Farndale West-side, and Farndale Low-Quarter, and the chapelry of Gillimoor, 2482 inhabitants, of whom 1905 are in the township of Kirkby-Moorside, 29 miles (N. by E.) from York, and 224 (N. by W.) from London. A Cistercian nunnery stood about a mile from the town; it was founded in the reign of Henry I. by Robert de Stuteville, and, on its Dissolution, had an income of £29. 6. 1. a year, and was granted to the Earl of Westmorland. In the year 1813, when its foundations were cleared away, several stone coffins were found. The manor was forfeited by the earl upon his attainder, in the reign of Elizabeth, and remained with the crown till it was bestowed by James I. upon his favourite, the Duke of Buckingham, whose son, after a life of dissipation, died here in comparative poverty. The estate was afterwards sold to Sir Charles Duncombe, ancestor of the present owner. The town is irregularly built on a rather elevated site, bounded on two sides by hills; and the scenery around is picturesque, embracing the vales of Kirkdale, Sleightholmedale, and Dowthwaite, and the eastern moors of Yorkshire, which border on the valleys. In the vicinity are several cornmills; a considerable quantity of malt is made; and near the town are limestone and freestone quarries, and coal-mines. The market is on Wednesday; and fairs are held on the Wednesday in Whitsun-week and Sept. 18th, for cattle, sheep, &c. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £14. 0. 10., and in the patronage of the Crown; net income, £417; impropriator, Lord Feversham: the glebe comprises 62½ acres, besides 30½ acres of moor allotment. The church is a neat edifice, and contains some ancient portions, with later insertions; it has some interesting memorials, among which is a curious marble monument with carved figures of Lady Brooke and her six sons and five daughters, all in a kneeling posture. There are chapels of ease at Cockan and Gillimoor; and the Society of Friends, Independents, Wesleyans, and Ranters, have places of worship. Some remains exist of the walls of the manor-house anciently belonging to the Neville family; and about three miles northward is a cairn, opened by Professor Phillips within the last few years, and left by him in a state to be examined by the curious. At a further distance of three miles in the same direction are three tumuli.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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