Kirkby-in-Cleveland, or Kirkby-cum-Broughton (St. Augustine)

KIRKBY-IN-CLEVELAND, or Kirkby-cum-Broughton (St. Augustine), a parish, in the union of Stokesley, W. division of the liberty of Langbaurgh, N. riding of York; containing, with the townships of Great and Little Broughton, 712 inhabitants, of whom 201 are in the township of Kirkby, 2 miles (S. E. by S.) from Stokesley. The Balliols were anciently proprietors here, as were also the families of Kirkby and Eure; and much of the land appears to have been granted at an early period to religious houses, including those of Guisborough and Rivaulx. In the hamlet of Dromanby, in the parish, the monks of Fountains had some possessions by grants of different benefactors; and among other landowners have been the families of Stormey and Constable. The township of Kirkby and hamlet of Dromanby comprise 1680 acres, chiefly arable land, with some meadow and pasture; and the soil throughout the whole parish is a strong clay. The village, which is small, is at the foot of a range of the Cleveland hills. At Broughton, a part of the population is engaged in hand-loom weaving. The living comprises a discharged vicarage, and a sinecure rectory, the former valued in the king's books at £5. 6. 3., and the latter at £21. 8. 6½.; the Archbishop of York appoints to the rectory, and the Rector to the vicarage. The tithes of the former have been commuted for above £600, and of the latter for £155. The church, which has a square tower, was erected in 1815, upon the site of a smaller cruciform structure, which belonged to the monastery of Whitby and at the Dissolution came to the king, by whom it was granted to the archbishop, in exchange for other possessions. A free grammar school was founded in 1708, by Henry Edmunds, Esq., who endowed it with an estate producing £60 per annum.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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