Kingsland (St. Michael)

KINGSLAND (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Leominster, hundred of Stretford, county of Hereford, 4 miles (N. W. by W.) from Leominster; containing 1088 inhabitants. Tradition relates that near the parsonage-house is the site of an ancient castle, the burial-place of King Merwald. During the reign of Edward I., the widow of Edward, Lord Mortimer, obtained a grant for a market and a fair, the former of which has been long discontinued, but the latter is still held on Oct. 11th, for horses, cattle, hops, cheese, &c. In West Field is a pedestal, erected in 1799 by the neighbouring gentry, commemorative of the celebrated battle of Mortimer's Cross, fought in 1461, in which the Earl of Pembroke was defeated by the Duke of York, afterwards Edward IV., with the loss of about 4000 men; the earl escaped, but his father, Sir Owen Tudor, was taken prisoner and immediately beheaded. Kingsland constituted part of the dower of Catherine, queen of Charles II. The parish comprises 4581 acres by measurement, and is intersected by the rivers Lug, Pinsley, and Arrow, and the roads from Leominster to Presteign and Kington. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £31. 3. 6½., and in the gift of the Rev. Richard Davies Evans, the present rector: the tithes have been commuted for £785 payable to the rector, and £55 payable to the grammar school of Eardisland: the glebe comprises 66 acres of excellent land. The church is a handsome and massive edifice, built in the reign of Edward I., by Lord Mortimer; it is in the early English style, and has a curious chamber, called "Volka's Chamber," which, according to tradition, was erected by the builder for his own interment. A school endowed with £10 per annum, by Thomas Woodhouse, is conducted on the national plan: a school-house has lately been built.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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