Kingsbury (St. Peter and St. Paul)

KINGSBURY (St. Peter and St. Paul), a parish, in the union of Tamworth, Tamworth division of the hundred of Hemlingford, N. division of Warwickshire, 4 miles (S. by E.) from Fazeley; containing 1322 inhabitants. This parish, which is intersected by the river Tame, comprises about 8000 acres, whereof twothirds are arable, and the remainder meadow and pasture. The surface is generally flat, with the exception of the eminences on which the village and the hamlet of Hurley are situated; the soil around Kingsbury is fertile, but in the vicinity of Hurley of inferior quality. Kingsbury Hall, now a farmhouse, is of great antiquity, and appears to have been originally of very considerable extent, and to have been defended by fortifications, of which some vestiges may still be traced. The Birmingham and Fazeley canal, and the Birmingham and Derby railway, pass through the parish, in which the latter has a station. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £8. 10., and in the patronage of the Crown; net income, £120, with a glebe-house erected in 1835; impropriators, the landholders. The church, erected in 1603, is a neat structure with a square embattled tower, and contains an elegant monument to the Earl of Carhampton. There is a chapel at Dosthill, in the parish of Tamworth, dependent on the vicarage; and a school is endowed with a house and land valued at £33 per annum.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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