Kimble, Great (St. Nicholas)

KIMBLE, GREAT (St. Nicholas), a parish, in the union of Wycombe, hundred of Aylesbury, county of Buckingham, 3¼ miles (W. S. W.) from Wendover; containing 489 inhabitants, of whom 68 are in the hamlet of Kimble-Wick. This place, according to old records, was anciently called Kunebel, from Cunobelin, or Cymbeline, the British king, whose sons here gallantly opposed the Romans, but were defeated, and one of them slain. There are still the remains of several intrenchments on the supposed field of battle; and on a circular mound in the neighbourhood are vestiges of a fortification termed Belinus' Castle, where it is said Cunobelin dwelt. The parish comprises 2472a. 3r. 2p.: the soil is various, partly clay and loam, alternated with chalk and gravel; the surface, in some parts flat, is in others diversified with hills, and the low lands are watered by a brook which issues from a copious spring. The living is a discharged vicarage, consolidated in 1799 with the rectory of Great Hampden, and valued in the king's books at £6. 10. 5.: the impropriate tithes have been commuted for £171. 1., and the vicarial for £150; the glebe comprises 4½ acres.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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