Kildale (St. Cuthbert)

KILDALE (St. Cuthbert), a parish, in the union of Stokesley, W. division of the liberty of Langbaurgh, N. riding of York, 5½ miles (E. by N.) from Stokesley; containing 181 inhabitants. This place, called in Domesday book Childale, was once of some importance, possessed a castle, and had liberty to hold a market and fair under grant from Henry III. It was conferred by the Conqueror on Robert de Brus, lord of Skelton, to be held of the king in capite; and among the proprietors who have resided here, occur the family of Percy, who were long settled at the place. The parish forms part of the district called Cleveland, and comprises upwards of 5000 acres, a great portion of which is open moor and heath; the soil of the cultivated land is good, and the scenery around the village, which is situated in a vale in the midst of lofty hills, is very beautiful. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £10. 3. 4., and in the patronage of Mrs. Livesey; net income, £120. The church stands in a low retired situation, not far from the site of the ancient castle, at a little distance from the village, towards the south; it is a very ancient structure, said to have been founded at an early period of the heptarchy. About 1312, the friars of the order of the Holy Cross began to erect an oratory here; but the work being interdicted by Archbishop Grenfield, it was abandoned.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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