Kilburn

KILBURN, a hamlet, partly in the parish of Willesden, union of Hendon, Kensington division of the hundred of Ossulstone, and partly in the parish of Hampstead, union of Edmonton, Holborn division of the hundred of Ossulstone, county of Middlesex, 3 miles (W. N. W.) from London. This village, which is situated on the ancient Watling-street, contains some good houses; and the salubrity of the air, and its convenient distance from the metropolis, render it a desirable place of residence. The supply of water, however, is indifferent. There is a medicinal spring, called Kilburn Wells, which possesses aperient properties, and is still in repute, though not so much frequented as formerly. At the north-east end of the village is an extensive ale and porter brewery. The Birmingham railway crosses the village near the Bell inn, and the road from Maida-Hill is carried over it by a neat bridge. Here is a proprietary episcopal chapel, a handsome edifice with a turret and cupola, containing about 500 sittings: the living is a donative, in the gift of Mr. Hancox, the proprietor. Near the close of the reign of Henry I., a Benedictine nunnery, dedicated to the Blessed Virgin Mary and St. John the Baptist, was founded here on the site of an ancient hermitage; the revenue, at the Dissolution, was estimated at £121. 16.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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