Keyne, St.

KEYNE, ST., a parish, in the union of Liskeard, hundred of West, E. division of Cornwall, 2½ miles (S.) from Liskeard; containing 194 inhabitants. The parish derives its name from St. Kayne, or Keyna, said to have been the daughter of Braganus, Prince of Brecknockshire, who lived in the fifth century. It comprises by computation 800 acres: the soil is generally a stiff yellow clay; the surface is diversified with hills, and the low grounds are watered by the river Looe. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £5. 18. 6½., and in the gift of Lieut. Cory, R. N.: the tithes have been commuted for £140, and there are 25 acres of glebe. The church is a small plain edifice, and near it is St. Kayne's well, long celebrated in legendary tales for its peculiar virtues; the roof of the inclosure supports, in a singular manner, five trees, two of oak, two of ash, and one of elm, planted more than half a century ago.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

Navigation

Preface
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z